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MBA&M IS PROUD TO PRESENT…..

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~JEAN FULLERTON~

Move over “Call the Midwife” here comes “CALL NURSE MILLIE”…..

CALL NURSE MILLIE

Call Nurse Millie

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MBA&M: Good morning, Jean! Please tell our readers a little about yourself?

JF:  I was born within the sound of Bow Bells in Whitechapel – Jack the Ripper country – and I absolutely adore my birth place of East London where my family has lived in the area since the 1820s. I use real East London locations and have my characters walking past actual shops and houses that once existed. I have also drawn on my family heritage for many of my stories, such as the charity school, public houses and market.

I’m a qualified District Nurse and now teach nursing studies at a London University. I live with my hero of thirty-five years just outside London in Epping Forest and have three grown-up daughters.    

I started writing eleven years ago after a work-related stress management course and will continue to do so until they prise the keyboard out from under my cold dead hand.  


MBA&M: What was your inspiration behind writing “Call Nurse Millie”?

JF: I suppose my own East London background inspired the setting and many of the character in Call Nurse Millie. Growing up in the 1960s the Second World War was still a real memory to my family. My dad and his brothers fought with the 8th Army in North Africa and my mother and aunts lived in London all through the blitz. To them life events were always ‘before’ or ‘after’ the war.      

I didn’t want to set my book in the actual war years, so Call Nurse Millie starts in 1945 as the troops begin to return home and the inhabitants of London attempt to put their lives back together. For 25-year-old Millie, a qualified nurse and midwife, the jubilation at the end of the war is short-lived as she tends to the needs of the East End community around her. But while Millie witnesses tragedy and brutality in her job, she also finds strength and kindness. And when misfortune befalls her own family, it is the enduring spirit of the community that shows Millie that even the toughest of circumstances can be overcome.

Through Millie’s eyes, we see the harsh realities and unexpected joys in the lives of the patients she treats, as well as the camaraderie that is forged with the fellow nurses that she lives with. Filled with unforgettable characters and moving personal stories, this vividly brings to life the colourful world of a post-war East London.

MBA&M: How hard was it to find research on this topic during the 1940’s in London?

JF: I always try to use first-hand accounts of a period such as diaries or official reports, as well as historical non-fiction books to start my research. I did this to get the background for what it was like to live in post-war East London but as the period is still within living memory I managed to find a couple of nurses who actual worked in East London at the time and was able to interviews retired district nurses as part of my research. 


MBA&M: Does Nurse Millie represent anyone close to you or did she just appeared to you?
JF: I never base any of my characters on real people so Millie, like all my previous heroines, came straight out of my head. But when I read her story back I felt she represented the generation of nurses for whom nursing was a vocation rather than a career and who regarded their patients’ health and wellbeing as their paramount duty.

MBA&M: Who was your favorite character to write and why?

JF: As the heroine and hero Millie and Alex are my favourite characters but I did enjoy creating Mr Shottington, the pompous hospital consultant and Millie’s Aunt Ruby who was really my Aunt Nell.  

MBA&M: What was your favorite scene to write and your worst or most disturbing scene to write?

JF: I love so many of the scenes I can’t really pick a favourite but one of my top five has to be the one where Millie and Alex meet at a VJ night dance. My most disturbing scene was when Millie visits her mother in a mental hospital as it brought back memories of visiting my mother when she was an inpatient in a similar institution in the 1960s.  

MBA&M: If you could go back in time when would it be and where would you go?

JF: Everywhere from Senlac Hill to see William the Bastard change English history, to the Scottish Highlands fighting for Robert the Bruce then onto Boston in 1776 to witness ‘the shot heard ’round the world’ at the start of the American War of Independence, then to work alongside Florence Nightingale in the Crimea and finally to experience the wartime spirit in the London Blitz.

Unfortunately the only way I can time travel at the moment is in my head which according to my Hero-at-Home is probably just as well as he thinks if I went back in time I’d be burnt as a witch for nagging people to wash their hands!!!     


MBA&M: Jean, we all or me anyway, want to know, do you watch “Call The Midwife” on PBS? If so, what is your impression of this series? and Who is your favorite character on “Call The Midwife”?

JF: I do watch Call the Midwife. Over here it’s on the BBC and think they are all great characters but I have to say I like Chummy as like me she can’t ride a bike and married a policeman.

I also like Sister Julienne who is the mother superior. It’s nice to see a person of faith portrayed as an ordinary human being.

 
MBA&M: Now,Jean, please tell our readers where to connect with you and where they may purchase a copy of “Call Nurse Millie”?

You can purchase a paperback or ebook copy of Call Nurse Millie most easily from Amazon at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Call-Nurse-Millie-ebook/dp/B00BMUVRT0/ref=sr_1_1_bnp_1_kin?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1363121249&sr=1-1

And you can connect to me on my website at www.jeanfullerton.com to find out about me, my previous books, and my East London heritage along with pictures of the actual East London locations I use in my books.

You can also find me on Facebook as Jean Fullerton and follow me on Twitter as @EastLondonGirly  

And thank you MBA & M for giving me the chance to speak to your lovely readers.

 

I am a retired nurse,myself and am always interested in nursing. We get so little credit and so much work,thank you for writing “Call Nurse Millie”. Nursing is something you have to love to do….. I couldn’t agree more. Thanks for having me on MBA.

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jeanfullertonAuthor bio

Jean Fullerton is the author of four previous historical novels, which were set in Victorian East London. Her book have won a number of awards and been shortlisted in national competitions. A native East Ender, she is also a qualified District and Queen’s nurse who has spent most of her working life in the East End of London, first as a Sister in charge of a team, and then as a District Nurse tutor. She is also a qualified teacher and now lectures on community nursing studies in a London university.

Find out more at www.jeanfullerton.com

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Book details

Title: Call Nurse Millie
Author: Jean Fullerton
Genre: Post WW2 Historical Fiction.
Publisher: Orion Fiction
Pages: 432
ISBN-13:
978-1409137405

Here’s the blurb:

 

Call Nurse MillieIt’s 1945 and, as the troops begin to return home, the inhabitants of London attempt to put their lives back together. For 25-year-old Millie, a qualified nurse and midwife, the jubilation at the end of the war is short-lived as she tends to the needs of the East End community around her. But while Millie witnesses tragedy and brutality in her job, she also finds strength and kindness. And when misfortune befalls her own family, it is the enduring spirit of the community that shows Millie that even the toughest of circumstances can be overcome.

 

 

 

Through Millie’s eyes, we see the harsh realities and unexpected joys in the lives of the patients she treats, as well as the camaraderie that is forged with the fellow nurses that she lives with. Filled with unforgettable characters and moving personal stories, this vividly brings to life the colourful world of a post-war East London.

 

 

 

An absorbing and richly detailed novel following the life and work of a young nurse in post-war East London – perfect for anyone who loved CALL THE MIDWIFE.

 

 

 

Call Nurse Millie is released by Orion on the 23rd May, and will be available from Amazon UKThe Book Depository and all other good book retailers.


You can purchase a paperback or ebook copy of Call Nurse Millie most easily from Amazon at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Call-Nurse-Millie-ebook/dp/B00BMUVRT0/ref=sr_1_1_bnp_1_kin?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1363121249&sr=1-1

 

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Excerpt:

 

Millie Sullivan pushed an escaped curl of auburn hair from her eyes with the back of her hand. She wished she’d put on her cotton petticoat under her navy blue uniform instead of the rayon one. Although the milk float was only just rolling along the street, it was already sweltering hot.
       With a practised hand Millie wrapped the newborn infant in a warm towel. ‘There we go, young lady, say hello to your ma.’
        She handed the child to the woman propped up in the bed. Mo Driscoll, already mother to four lively boys, took the baby.
         ‘Thank you, Sister,’ she said, tucking her daughter into the crook of her arm and gazing down at the baby. ‘Isn’t she beautiful?’
         ‘She’s an angel,’ Mo’s mother, standing on the other side of the bed, replied. ‘And a welcome change.’ She looked at Millie. ‘I’ll clear up, Sister. You look done in.’
          ‘I am, but thankfully it’s my last night on call.’ Millie handed a parcel of newspaper containing soiled gauze to the older woman. ‘Could you pop these on the fire?’
          ‘To be sure.’ She took the packet and threw it in the zinc bucket alongside the dirty linen. ‘That superintendent works you nurses too hard. You should try and put your feet up when you get back.’
          Millie smiled. Chance would be a fine thing.
          She plopped her instruments into the small gallipot half-filled with Dettol, took off her gloves and glanced at her watch. Eight-thirty a.m.!
         Thank goodness. She’d be back by the time Miss Summers gave out the day’s work. Also, as Annie Fletcher, the trainee Queen’s Nurse student assigned to Millie, was laid up with tonsillitis, Millie had given a couple of Annie’s morning insulin injection visits to Gladys to do, and she wanted to make sure she’d done them.
          ‘Do you know what you’re going to call her?’ Millie asked Mo, washing her hands in the bowl balanced on the rickety bedside table.

 

           ‘Colleen, after me mum,’ she replied.
           Mother and daughter exchanged an affectionate look and Mille glanced at her watch again.
           She ought to get on, as she’d promised her own mum that she’d pop home in time for Churchill’s announcement at three p.m.
           Her parents, Doris and Arthur, only lived a short bus ride away in Bow but, as Millie had two newborns to check plus a handful of pregnant women to see before she swapped her midwifery
bag for her district one for her afternoon visits, it would be a close-run thing.
           Millie packed the four small enamel dressing-bowls inside each other, then stowed them in her case between her scissors and the bottle of Dettol. She snapped the clasp shut.
           ‘I’ll call back tomorrow, but if there’s any problem just ring Munroe House to get the on-call nurse,’ Millie said, squeezing down the side of the bed towards the door.
           Like so many others in East London, the Driscolls’ home was just the two downstairs rooms in an old terraced house that Hitler’s bombs had somehow missed.
           Colleen took the manila envelope tucked into side of the dressing table mirror and passed it to Millie. She opened it and took out two crumpled ten-shilling notes, popping them into the side pocket of her bag.
            ‘Thank you’ said Millie. ‘I’ll mark it in when I get back to the clinic.’

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To follow the tour,please visit:

 http://www.writermarketing.co.uk/prpromotion/blog-tours/currently-on-tour/jean-fullerton/

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Call Nurse Millie~GIVEAWAY ALERT~

(Sponsored by the author)

Thanks to Jean, we are offering 1 lucky commenter a print copy of “Call Nurse Millie” to 1 lucky commenter. Giveaway will run from May 27 until June 3,2013.

**You MUST comment on both this site and on the review**

*Please leave a valid email address for notification purposes only*

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Please check out “My Thoughts” on this title at:

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Thank you everyone for stopping by. Please spread the word and don’t forget the giveaway!

Thank you for stopping by and please spread the word!

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